231 Front Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 [email protected] 808.123.4567

Current Board

 

President

María L. Cruz-Torres  is an Associate Professor in the School of Transborder Studies at Arizona State University. Her areas of teaching and research include: political ecology; food systems; impact of globalization upon local communities and households; gender and work; gender, and sustainability; and the environmental and social aspects of natural resource management.

 

President Elect

Jonathan Rosa is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics, at Stanford University. His research analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa collaborates with schools and communities to track these phenomena and develop tools for understanding and eradicating the forms of disparity to which they correspond. He is author of the book Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad (2019, Oxford University Press) and co-editor of the volume Language and Social Justice in Practice (2019, Routledge). Dr. Rosa’s research has been supported by competitive grants and fellowships awarded by organizations including the National Science Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Social Science Research Council, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, and Ford Foundation. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, and Language in Society, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision. In recognition of this work, Dr. Rosa received the 2018 Charles A. Ferguson Award for Outstanding Scholarship from the Center for Applied Linguistics. Dr. Rosa obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago, and his B.A. in Linguistics and Educational Studies from Swarthmore College.

 

 

Treasurer

Lilian Milanés received her PhD in anthropology from the University of Kentucky in 2018.  In the fall of 2018 Dr. Milanés began working as an assistant professor of anthropology at William Paterson University, based in Wayne, New Jersey. As a medical anthropologist her research focuses on the various contexts of health inequities in the U.S., especially surrounding Latinx communities. Her dissertation depicted health narratives of Chicago Latinx in their experiences with diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol. As a product of various mentoring villages, she looks forward to engaging with mentorship at all levels within academia and local communities.

 

Graduate Student Representative

Cecilia Vásquez is a PhD Candidate at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  My research interests are immigration policies, activist research, and critical race theory. As the Graduate Student Representative in ALLA, I am interested in strengthening and growing our community. Please feel free to reach out!

 

 

2020 Program Committee

Chair

Jonathan Rosa is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics, at Stanford University. His research analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa collaborates with schools and communities to track these phenomena and develop tools for understanding and eradicating the forms of disparity to which they correspond. He is author of the book Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad (2019, Oxford University Press) and co-editor of the volume Language and Social Justice in Practice (2019, Routledge). Dr. Rosa’s research has been supported by competitive grants and fellowships awarded by organizations including the National Science Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Social Science Research Council, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, and Ford Foundation. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, and Language in Society, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision. In recognition of this work, Dr. Rosa received the 2018 Charles A. Ferguson Award for Outstanding Scholarship from the Center for Applied Linguistics. Dr. Rosa obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago, and his B.A. in Linguistics and Educational Studies from Swarthmore College.

 

Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez received a Ph.D. in Anthropology, USCD (1975). Intellectual interests are broadly comparative and applied and publications include eleven books in English and Spanish with three more translated into Spanish as well many articles and chapters with one monograph in press. He held professorships in anthropology at UCLA and the University of Arizona where in 1982 he was the founding director of the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology.   He became dean in 1994 at the University of California, Riverside of the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and founded the Ernest Galarza Applied Research Center, and in 2011 founded the School of Transborder Studies at Arizona State University.   Presently, he is Regents’ Professor of the School of Transborder Studies and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, and Motorola Presidential Professor of Neighborhood Revitalization, at Arizona State University. He has had numerous research and applied projects funded by private foundations and governmental agencies including the newest in 2016 which is a five-year project designed to recruit, train, and retain Mexican origin migrant students to Arizona State University.  His honors include the Bronislaw Malinowski Award, 1994 by the Society of Applied Anthropology; Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 1993-94; and elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1999.  On April 19, 2016, he was inducted as a Corresponding Member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences; the first foreign anthropologist selected and joined 107 other members including 10 Noble Prize winners. Most recently, he was elected as the NACCS Rocky Mountain Foco Scholar in 2016 and received the Saber es Poder Prize in 2018 from the Institute for Mexicans Abroad and the Mexican American Studies Department of the University of Arizona.  His book, Hegemonies of Language and their Discontents (Tucson: University of Arizona, 2017) was awarded Honorable Mention by the American Association of Latinas/os Anthropologists of the American Anthropology Association in November of 2018.

Members at Large

Patricia Zavella is an anthropologist and Professor Emerita of Latin American and Latina/o Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  She has published extensively in Chicanx-Latinx studies and feminist studies on issues related to poverty, family, sexuality, work, transnational migration, and social activism. Her latest publication is The Movement for Reproductive Justice: Empowering Women of Color Through Social Activism (New York University Press, 2020).

Book Award Committee

Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez received a Ph.D. in Anthropology, USCD (1975). Intellectual interests are broadly comparative and applied and publications include eleven books in English and Spanish with three more translated into Spanish as well many articles and chapters with one monograph in press. He held professorships in anthropology at UCLA and the University of Arizona where in 1982 he was the founding director of the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology.   He became dean in 1994 at the University of California, Riverside of the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and founded the Ernest Galarza Applied Research Center, and in 2011 founded the School of Transborder Studies at Arizona State University.   Presently, he is Regents’ Professor of the School of Transborder Studies and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, and Motorola Presidential Professor of Neighborhood Revitalization, at Arizona State University. He has had numerous research and applied projects funded by private foundations and governmental agencies including the newest in 2016 which is a five-year project designed to recruit, train, and retain Mexican origin migrant students to Arizona State University.  His honors include the Bronislaw Malinowski Award, 1994 by the Society of Applied Anthropology; Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 1993-94; and elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1999.  On April 19, 2016, he was inducted as a Corresponding Member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences; the first foreign anthropologist selected and joined 107 other members including 10 Noble Prize winners. Most recently, he was elected as the NACCS Rocky Mountain Foco Scholar in 2016 and received the Saber es Poder Prize in 2018 from the Institute for Mexicans Abroad and the Mexican American Studies Department of the University of Arizona.  His book, Hegemonies of Language and their Discontents (Tucson: University of Arizona, 2017) was awarded Honorable Mention by the American Association of Latinas/os Anthropologists of the American Anthropology Association in November of 2018.

Anthropology News Editors

Andrea Bolivar is an LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellow in the department of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Washington University, St. Louis. Her research ethnographically examines the experiences of sex working transgender Latina women in Chicago. Her interests include transgender studies, trans of color critique, Latinx studies, feminist studies, women of color feminism(s), queer of color critique, sexual labor.

Public Engagement Committee

 

Graduate Student Paper Committee

Maurice Rafael Magaña is Assistant Professor of Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. He is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research focuses on the cultural politics of youth organizing, transnational migration, race and ethnicity, urban space, and social movements in Mexico and the United States. His research provides a transnational perspective on historic marginalization, racialization, youth political culture and the role of art in activism. Dr. Magaña’s research has been funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the Ford Foundation and the Tokyo Foundation.